An Ode To the App, Run Pee

I am a huge fan of author Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum Number series.  For those who have perhaps never heard of this fantastic author or her books, this particular series is about a young woman who – after losing her job, car, and very nearly her apartment – goes to work for her cousin as a bond enforcement agent to make ends meet.  As an inexperienced bounty hunter, her bumbling efforts may read like a comedy of errors, but her determination sees to it  that in the end she always “gets her man/woman”.  The first book in the series, titled One For the Money, is being released on film in theaters tomorrow, and I am most excited to go see it!  (I can only hope that the producers for this movie have not taken too many liberties with the storyline as others have for other films…yes, M. Night Shyamalan, I’m looking at you.)

Whenever I go to the theater, there are three things I make sure to have with me: a travel mug of sweet tea (I am not paying a small fortune for soda at the concession stand, especially as I am not overly fond of soda), my Run Pee app on my phone, and a bag to keep it all in.  What is Run Pee, you may be wondering?  Made by polyGeek, this application’s purpose is to let moviegoers know the best times during the film to take a bathroom break (usually during scenes that are not as important to the plot and can therefore be missed), and how much time they have to conduct said break so as to not miss the best parts of the film.  As for myself, I use the app to determine whether or not I need to stay after the credits.  It is really nice to know ahead of time whether or not I need to stick around to catch those last few seconds of the movie.  (I hate waiting, only to find that there was nothing worth waiting for.)  To download this application, either click on this link to the android marketplace, or search “run pee” within your phone’s app store.  This app is available for both Android and Apple phones.

I am hoping to go see One For the Money this Saturday.  Until then, I need to dust off my bag, find my travel mug, and make sure my Run Pee app is up to date.  Then it’s on with the show!

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Paraskevidekatriaphobia – Say That Five Times Fast

In honor of today being Friday the thirteenth, I decided to do a little research into the origins behind the superstition.  Just what makes this particular day so unlucky?  Was there a ever an event behind the creation of the legend, or was a culmination of different events?  What caused paraskevidekatriaphobica (fear of Friday the thirteenth)?

According to the website UrbanLegends.com (one of the better and more informative sources I could find on this topic), both the number thirteen and the sixth day if the week (Friday) have been ill omens for quite some time.  The exact reason behind the number thirteen’s unlucky status is unknown, but several theories have been documented in an attempt to give explanation to it.  The theory I found most interesting was the story about the twelve gods.  Twelve gods were sent an invitation to attend a banquet (in Valhalla), and Loki – the god of mischief – decided to show up uninvited, subsequently making the number of guests to this dinner party thirteen.  While there, Loki caused one of the gods (Hod) to kill Balder, a favorite among the gods.  This sparked the Norse legend advising against thirteen people attending the same dinner party – now an omen of bad luck.  The website goes on to remind its readers of one of the most famous dinners, the Last Supper, and of its thirteen attendees – one of which betrayed Jesus and later committed suicide.  This dinner is said to have taken place on a Friday.

Legends seem to have always described Friday as being a particularly unlucky day – or at least they have for the last several hundred years.  There is a passage on the site in particular that caught my attention, and rather than attempting to paraphrase I am providing the content to you straight from the source.  “One hundred years ago, the British government sought to quell the longstanding superstition among seamen that setting sail on Fridays was unlucky. A special ship was commissioned and given the name “H.M.S. Friday.” They laid her keel on a Friday, launched her on a Friday, selected her crew on a Friday, and hired a man named Jim Friday to be her captain. To top it off, H.M.S. Friday embarked on her maiden voyage on a Friday — and was never seen or heard from again” (http://urbanlegends.about.com/cs/historical/a/friday_the_13th_3.htm).  Guess they sure showed that superstition a thing or two.

As for myself, I have never been able to buy into the superstition.  I believe we make our own luck.  My parents are celebrating an anniversary today – it was twenty-eight years ago to this day – January 13th, Friday – that they met for the first time.  They have been married for twenty-seven years.

Aside